The #childrenofsyria are a generation at risk of losing everything. They want and need to go to school. To be protected. To be comforted. These children need champions. These children need YOU to be their champion.
Because the children of Syria … are the future of Syria.
What is life like as a young refugee? From dawn until dusk, every hour with Nour, 13, shows the hardships she and millions of Syrian children endure every day, three years since the war began — and the occasional joys they hang on to far from home.

See photos and share a typical Friday with Nour in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which she and her family have called home since fleeing Syria last year. 

Photos: Cassandra Nelson/MercyCorps
What is life like as a young refugee? From dawn until dusk, every hour with Nour, 13, shows the hardships she and millions of Syrian children endure every day, three years since the war began — and the occasional joys they hang on to far from home.

See photos and share a typical Friday with Nour in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which she and her family have called home since fleeing Syria last year. 

Photos: Cassandra Nelson/MercyCorps
What is life like as a young refugee? From dawn until dusk, every hour with Nour, 13, shows the hardships she and millions of Syrian children endure every day, three years since the war began — and the occasional joys they hang on to far from home.

See photos and share a typical Friday with Nour in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which she and her family have called home since fleeing Syria last year. 

Photos: Cassandra Nelson/MercyCorps

What is life like as a young refugee? From dawn until dusk, every hour with Nour, 13, shows the hardships she and millions of Syrian children endure every day, three years since the war began — and the occasional joys they hang on to far from home.

See photos and share a typical Friday with Nour in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which she and her family have called home since fleeing Syria last year.

Photos: Cassandra Nelson/MercyCorps

Jouri, 10, fled Syria 18 months ago. “Here I can’t walk around freely. I can’t get all the kinds of food and sweets I had in Syria. I hope to go back to Syria by car with the windows rolled down so the fresh air can come inside.”

In their own words, young people in Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan tell us what it’s like to grow up without their home and what keeps them looking forward. Read their stories. 

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Jouri, 10, fled Syria 18 months ago. “Here I can’t walk around freely. I can’t get all the kinds of food and sweets I had in Syria. I hope to go back to Syria by car with the windows rolled down so the fresh air can come inside.”

In their own words, young people in Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan tell us what it’s like to grow up without their home and what keeps them looking forward. Read their stories.

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Mahmoud, 15, fled Syria 1 year ago. “I like being in a secure place away from the bombing, but I hope to go back to Syria and to go to school again. I don’t go to school here because the classes are crowded and the teachers are not interested in us. I hope that someday I can become a better person in my community and give back to Syria.” 

For young Syrians, it’s not just the horrors of war that haunt them — it’s the reality of loss and what they face every day now as refugees. Hear from children in Zaatari refugee camp. 

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Mahmoud, 15, fled Syria 1 year ago. “I like being in a secure place away from the bombing, but I hope to go back to Syria and to go to school again. I don’t go to school here because the classes are crowded and the teachers are not interested in us. I hope that someday I can become a better person in my community and give back to Syria.”

For young Syrians, it’s not just the horrors of war that haunt them — it’s the reality of loss and what they face every day now as refugees. Hear from children in Zaatari refugee camp.

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Syrian children carry the scars of the war they’ve fled — a war with no end in sight.

"If we don’t invest in them now, then we’ll certainly be hearing from them later," says Mercy Corps’ Regional Program Director Nigel Pont. Hear more in the video.

Make sure these children are not forgotten by signing the petition: bit.ly/nolostgeneration

Doulama was 18 years old when she was forced to flee her home in Damascus. Despite the bombing, violence and insecurity, she was reluctant to leave.

“At the beginning I didn’t want to run away because I needed to take my official exams for high school,” she explained. “But then my schoolmate was killed, so I knew I couldn’t stay.”

Doulama and her family fled to Lebanon where they have been for the past two years. In this video, Doulama talks about escaping Syria and how she dreams of going back home.

Learn more about Syria’s youth and what you can do to help.

This tiny baby was born in the Zaatari refugee camp just a few days before the third anniversary of the Syrian conflict.

Born in exile like more than 37 000 Syrian babies, far from his homeland, and with few prospects of a normal childhood. He will join the millions of other Syrian children who have been uprooted and traumatised by violence and whose future is uncertain.

He could become one of the “Lost Generation” of Syria.

This must not happen.

The conflict must cease and the children of Syria given back the opportunity for a happy and safe future.

http://bit.ly/nolostgeneration

This tiny baby was born in the Zaatari refugee camp just a few days before the third anniversary of the Syrian conflict.

Born in exile like more than 37 000 Syrian babies, far from his homeland, and with few prospects of a normal childhood. He will join the millions of other Syrian children who have been uprooted and traumatised by violence and whose future is uncertain.

He could become one of the “Lost Generation” of Syria.

This must not happen.

The conflict must cease and the children of Syria given back the opportunity for a happy and safe future.

http://bit.ly/nolostgeneration

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